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  • How to set up SSH for No Password on SunOS

    Posted by "" in "solaris" on 2008-09-09

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    This setup will allow you to log in to another account without having to provide the password.

         Identify the Sun Server’s and its user id’s among which you wish to enable secure session without passwords. The below steps concentrates on SSH2, the second version of SSH. Don’t use the first version any longer; it contains security bugs. Also, older versions of the second version’s SSH might contain security bugs.

    Check with ssh -V that your version matches the latest one available from OpenSSH.

    root@ffus # ssh -V
    Sun_SSH_1.1, SSH protocols 1.5/2.0, OpenSSL 0x0090704f

    If you can’t find any of the SSH commands (ssh and scp, for instance) on your system, get the SSH package first and install it. This suite should also install the ssh-keygen command on your machine. Make sure that SSH is installed on every system that you want to access.
    Starting from the Solaris 9 OS, SSH is included in the distribution. If you can’t find a package suitable for your version, refer to the OpenSSH web site for the source, and then download, unpack, read the README, compile, and install. Systems missing OpenSSL have to add that package as well for SSH to work.
    Test, for example, ssh localserver; this will create a .ssh subdirectory in your $HOME directory. SSH among UNIX users residing on the same Server.

    Assumptions:
    UNIX Server: ffus
    User 1: root
    User 2: oraffus
    User 3: appffus

    Requirement: You want to provide secure shell session between User 1 & User 2 and User 1 and User 3 with no passwords.

    This means that User 1 root can execute commands, shell scripts in User 2 oraffus shell and User3 appffus shell without providing passwords.

    Create personal SSH key in User 1
    If this is first time you are creating SSH key then its possible that User 1 does not have “.ssh” directory in its home directory. If the “.ssh” directory exists then possibly the SSH key has been generated. Check the directory for the key. Alternatively you can re-create the key as follows.
    —————–
    root@ffus # hostname
    ffus
    root@ffus # id
    luid=0(root) gid=0(root)
    root@ffus # ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (//.ssh/id_dsa):
    Created directory ‘//.ssh’.
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in / /.ssh/id_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in /t/.ssh/id_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    7f:95:e0:76:3b:77:80:6a:d0:9a:3c:eb:d2:b2:32:a8
    root@ffus
    ———————–

    This creates id_dsa and id_dsa.pub in $HOME/.ssh. If you want to enable remote connections that don’t require a password, do not enter a passphrase. If you do enter a non-empty passphrase, when connecting to the remote server you will be asked for the passphrase instead of the password!
    ———————–

    root@ffus # cd /.ssh
    root@ffus # pwd
    /.ssh
    root@ffus #
    root@ffus # ls -lrt
    total 14
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 19 14:18 id_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 600 Sep 19 14:18 id_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 670 Sep 21 11:42 known_hosts
    root@ffus #
    ——————

    Rename the key generated ida_dsa.pub to reflect the uniquely the key of user id on that server. i.e., rename id_dsa.pub to root_ffus_dsa.pub.

    Append the public key to the file authorized_keys2:
    root@ffus # cat root_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    Don’t worry if authorized_keys2 does not yet exist before you execute this command.

    root@ffus # ls -lrt

    total 14
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 19 14:18 id_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 600 Sep 19 14:18 root_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 1808 Sep 19 15:21 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 670 Sep 21 11:42 known_hosts
    root@ffus #

    Create personal SSH key in User 2

    As done for User 1 carry out the same steps for User 2.
    $ hostname
    ffus
    $ id
    uid=100(oraffus) gid=101(dba)
    $ pwd
    /home/oraffus
    $ ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (/home/oraffus/.ssh/id_dsa): /home/oraffus/.ssh/oraffus_ffus _dsa
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in /home/oraffus/.ssh/oraffus_ffus_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in /home/oraffus/.ssh/oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    15:05:69:cd:3e:6e:bc:9d:ba:6d:a7:15:0c:9f:ab:4d oraffus@ffus
    $ cd .ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 222 Aug 29 16:43 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oraffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    $ cat oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrttotal 8
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 222 Aug 29 16:43 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oraffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:35 authorized_keys2
    $
     

    .

    Create personal SSH key in User 3.
    As done for User 1 and 2 carry out the same steps for User 3.
    $ hostname
    ffus
    $ id
    uid=102(appffus) gid=101(dba)
    $ pwd
    /home/appffus
    $ ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (/home/appffus/.ssh/id_dsa): /home/appffus/.ssh/appffus_ffus_dsa
    Created directory ‘/home/appffus/.ssh’.
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in /home/appffus/.ssh/appffus_ffus_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in /home/appffus/.ssh/appffus_ffus_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    98:bc:68:49:7b:e2:05:5d:f9:ed:09:35:5d:4e:d3:ea appffus@ffus
    $ cd .ssh
    $ pwd
    /home/appffus/.ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 4
    -rw——- 1 appffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    $ cat appffus_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw——- 1 appffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:38 authorized_keys2
    $
     

    Now you should already be able to make a secure connection to your own machine, using this account, without having to provide a password.

    Check permissions on your keys and refer to the man page. The id_dsa file should be private, the other keys world readable.

    On the remote server, generate keys in the same way for your account on that server.
    Copy your public key into ~/.ssh/ on the remote server.
    root@ffus # hostname
    iffus
    root@ffus # id
    uid=0(root) gid=0(root)
    root@ffus #
    root@ffus # cp /home/appffus/.ssh/appffus_ffus_dsa.pub .
    root@ffus # cp /home/oraffus/.ssh/oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub .
    root@ffus # ls -lrt
    total 18
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 19 14:18 id_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 600 Sep 19 14:18 root_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 1808 Sep 19 15:21 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 670 Sep 21 11:42 known_hosts
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 604 Sep 21 14:43 appffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 604 Sep 21 14:44 oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    root@ffus #
    Do the same thing for the remote key; copy it into your local ~/.ssh directory:

    root@ffus # scp root_ffus_dsa.pub oraffus@ffus:/home/oraffus/.ssh
    Password:
    root_ffus_dsa.pub 100% |***************************************************| 600 00:00
    root@ffus # scp root_ffus_dsa.pub appffus@ffus:/home/appffus/.ssh
    Password:
    root_ffus_dsa.pub 100% |***************************************************| 600 00:00
    root@ffus #
    On both servers, append the key from the other server to the file authorized_keys2:
    root@ffus # cat appffus_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    root@ffus # cat oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    root@ffus # ls -lrt
    total 20
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 19 14:18 id_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 600 Sep 19 14:18 root_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 670 Sep 21 11:42 known_hosts
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 604 Sep 21 14:43 appffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 604 Sep 21 14:44 oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 3016 Sep 21 14:53 authorized_keys2

    $ cat root_ffus_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 12
    -rw——- 1 oraffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:34 oraffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 450 Sep 21 14:48 known_hosts
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 600 Sep 21 14:51 root_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 1204 Sep 21 14:54 authorized_keys2
    $

    $ ls -lrt
    total 10
    -rw——- 1 appffus dba 668 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 604 Sep 21 14:38 appffus_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 600 Sep 21 14:51 root_ffus_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 1204 Sep 21 14:54 authorized_keys2
    $
    Try to connect to the remote server now:
    root@ffus # ssh oraffus@ffus “ls -la”
    total 46
    drwxr-xr-x 6 oraffus dba 512 Sep 19 11:56 .
    drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 512 Jul 3 10:03 ..
    -rw——- 1 oraffus dba 42 Sep 15 11:04 .bash_history
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 56 Aug 4 16:24 .profile
    -rw——- 1 oraffus dba 8748 Sep 21 14:54 .sh_history
    drwx—— 2 oraffus dba 512 Sep 21 14:51 .ssh
    drwx—— 3 oraffus dba 512 Aug 29 16:43 .sunw
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 66 Aug 11 12:33 afiedt.buf
    -rw-r–r– 1 oraffus dba 42 Jul 31 15:09 ffus.ffpl
    -rwxr-xr-x 1 oraffus dba 1060 Sep 21 13:55 startDB_FFUS
    -rwxr-xr-x 1 oraffus dba 1310 Sep 21 13:56 stopDB_FFUS
    drwxr-xr-x 2 oraffus dba 512 Jul 31 15:09 testbkp
    drwxr-xr-x 2 oraffus dba 512 Sep 19 11:57 work
    root@ffus #

    root@ffus # ssh appffus@ffus “ls -la”
    total 1216
    drwxr-xr-x 4 appffus dba 512 Sep 21 14:38 .
    drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 512 Jul 3 10:03 ..
    -rw——- 1 appffus dba 72 Sep 15 11:11 .bash_history
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 99 Sep 21 09:51 .profile
    -rw——- 1 appffus dba 83418 Sep 21 10:10 .sh_history
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 570 Jul 17 13:47 t1
    -rw-r–r– 1 appffus dba 465 Aug 23 14:47 t2
    drwxr-xr-x 2 appffus dba 512 Jul 7 13:01 work
    root@ffus #

    .
    Server1: ukdba.com
    Server2: inddba.com
    root@ukdba.com # hostname
    ukdba.com
    root@ukdba.com # id
    uid=0(root) gid=0(root)
    root@ukdba.com # pwd
    /
    root@ukdba.com # ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (//.ssh/id_dsa): //.ssh/root_ukdba.com_dsa
    Created directory ‘//.ssh’.
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in //.ssh/root_ukdba.com_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in //.ssh/root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    e1:95:a5:09:e0:56:24:ac:e1:51:2a:73:c9:09:c5:e2 root@ukdba.com

    root@ukdba.com # cd .ssh
    root@ukdba.com # ls -lrt
    total 4
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    root@ukdba.com # cat root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    root@ukdba.com # ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:52 authorized_keys2


    root@inddba.com # hostname

    inddba.com
    root@inddba.com # id
    uid=0(root) gid=0(root)
    root@inddba.com # pwd
    /
    root@inddba.com # ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (//.ssh/id_dsa): //.ssh/root_inddba.com_dsa
    Created directory ‘//.ssh’.Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in //.ssh/root_inddba.com_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in //.ssh/root_inddba.com_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    62:39:aa:8b:04:c6:81:36:15:08:99:75:5e:26:04:86 root@inddba.com
    root@inddba.com # ls -lrt
    total 4
    root@inddba.com # ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 21 15:55 root_inddba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:55 root_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:56 authorized_keys2
    root@inddba.com #
    $ hostname
    ukdba.com
    $ id
    uid=102(oaprod) gid=100(dba)
    $ pwd
    /home/oaprod
    $ ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (/home/oaprod/.ssh/id_dsa): /home/oaprod/.ssh/oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in /home/oaprod/.ssh/oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in /home/oaprod/.ssh/oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    26:d5:11:3b:92:eb:fb:3d:20:f0:ab:54:db:d1:f1:13 oaprod@ukdba.com
    $ cd .ssh
    $ pwd
    /home/oaprod/.ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 228 Sep 19 09:32 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaprod dba 668 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    $ cat oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 8
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 228 Sep 19 09:32 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaprod dba 668 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:58 authorized_keys2
    $ hostname
    inddba.com
    $ id
    uid=101(oaospxy) gid=100(dba)
    $ pwd
    /home/oaospxy
    $ ssh-keygen -t dsa
    Generating public/private dsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (/home/oaospxy/.ssh/id_dsa): /home/oaospxy/.ssh/oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
    Enter same passphrase again:
    Your identification has been saved in /home/oaospxy/.ssh/oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.
    Your public key has been saved in /home/oaospxy/.ssh/oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    f1:4f:15:b4:6c:f1:c9:e9:31:79:37:ad:6e:09:71:0a oaospxy@inddba.com
    $ cd .ssh
    $ pwd
    /home/oaospxy/.ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 6
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 228 Sep 19 09:26 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaospxy dba 668 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    $ cat oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 8
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 228 Sep 19 09:26 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaospxy dba 668 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 authorized_keys2
    $

    root@ukdba.com # hostname
    ukdba.com
    root@ukdba.com # id
    uid=0(root) gid=0(root)
    root@ukdba.com # pwd
    /.ssh
    root@ukdba.com # ls -lrt
    total 8
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:52 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 231 Sep 21 16:07 known_hosts
    root@ukdba.com # scp oaospxy@inddba.com:/apphome/oaospxy/.ssh/oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub .
    The authenticity of host ‘inddba.com (192.9.100.10)’ can’t be established.
    RSA key fingerprint is 12:b0:35:37:07:2d:b3:f2:f7:80:1f:24:f5:f1:03:08.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
    Warning: Permanently added ‘inddba.com,192.9.100.10′ (RSA) to the list of known hosts.Password:
    oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa 100% |**************************************************************************| 606 00:00
    root@ukdba.com #
    root@ukdba.com # scp root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub oaospxy@inddba.com:/apphome/oaospxy/.ssh
    Password:
    root_ukdba.com_dsa.pu 100%

    root@ukdba.com # cp root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub /home/oaprod/.ssh
    root@ukdba.com # ls -lrt
    total 14
    -rw——- 1 root root 668 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:51 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 15:52 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 462 Sep 21 16:13 known_hosts
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 606 Sep 21 16:13 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 606 Sep 21 16:16 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    root@ukdba.com # cat oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    root@ukdba.com # cat oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2

    $ hostname
    ukdba.com
    $ id
    uid=102(oaprod) gid=100(dba)
    $ pwd
    /home/oaprod/.ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 10
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 228 Sep 19 09:32 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaprod dba 668 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:58 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 16:17 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    $ cat root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 12
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 228 Sep 19 09:32 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaprod dba 668 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 606 Sep 21 15:57 oaprod_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 root root 603 Sep 21 16:17 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaprod dba 1209 Sep 21 16:20 authorized_keys2
    $
    $ hostname
    inddba.com
    $ id
    uid=101(oaospxy) gid=100(dba)
    $ pwd
    /apphome/oaospxy/.ssh
    $ ls -lrt
    total 10
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 228 Sep 19 09:26 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaospxy dba 668 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 authorized_keys2
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 603 Sep 21 16:24 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    $ cat root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub >>authorized_keys2
    $ ls -lrt
    total 12
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 228 Sep 19 09:26 known_hosts
    -rw——- 1 oaospxy dba 668 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 606 Sep 21 16:03 oaospxy_inddba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 603 Sep 21 16:24 root_ukdba.com_dsa.pub
    -rw-r–r– 1 oaospxy dba 1209 Sep 21 16:26 authorized_keys2
    $

    4 Responses to “How to set up SSH for No Password on SunOS”

    1. tnycman says:

      Hello,

      I need to reset a Solaris 8 password, please contact me at tnjman@gmail.com

    2. Rajat says:

      Hi ,
      Sorry for delay in reply , Check your SSH version , it should be latest , or upgrade the same ..if it is old .. then u can go ahead the steps i mentioned .. rest of the things remain same .

      ssh -v will give ur version

    3. Shahid says:

      Hi Rajat,
      Your post is really helpful. I have a question, a user called up and said ‘he cannot create .ssh directory in xyz server’. What could be possible solution. I’ve root permissions whereas he don’t.

    4. Atul Kumar says:

      Shahid,
      Check if that user has write permission on directory in which he is creating .ssh directory.

    Leave a Reply



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